Liam & Jordan Liam & Jordan

The needs of people with diabetes are not only limited to adequate glycaemic control but also correspond with preventing complications; disability limitation and rehabilitation. The essential self-care behaviours in people with diabetes which predict good outcomes are healthy eating, being physically active, monitoring of blood sugar, compliant with medications, good problem-solving skills, healthy coping skills and risk-reduction behaviours. All these behaviours have been found to be positively correlated with good glycaemic control, reduction of complications and improvement in quality of life. 

  • Checking your blood sugar by self is one of the best ways to be sure your diabetes is under control
  • Checking often will tell you:     

         -  If your insulin or other diabetes medicine is working      

         -  How physical activity, the foods you eat, and stress affect your blood sugar 

  • Please consult your doctor on when and how often you should check your blood sugar

  • You should take up the responsibility of your diabetes care plan. Take an active role to make sure your care plan works for you. If you have questions, ask your doctor! 
  • If there are things about your care plan that are working well for you, and things that aren't, let your doctor know that too
    • Part of managing your diabetes is setting your goals and knowing your numbers. Like your diabetes care plan, your goals are just for you. Talk with your doctor about your goals

    • Checking your blood sugar by self is one of the best ways to be sure your diabetes is under control
    • Checking often will tell you:     

             -  If your insulin or other diabetes medicine is working      

             -  How physical activity, the foods you eat, and stress affect your blood sugar 

    • Please consult your doctor on when and how often you should check your blood sugar

    • HbA1c is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. It's like a “memory” of your blood sugar levels. It shows how well you're controlling your blood sugar levels over time. 
    • Your HbA1c is made up of your FPG (your blood sugar readings when you wake up) and your PPG (your blood sugar readings 2 hours after you eat). Both must be under control to get your HbA1c under control. If you take insulin, the long-acting insulin you take at night or in the morning will control your FPG. And if you need it, your mealtime insulin may help control your PPG 
    • At least 2 to 4 times a year, have your HbA1c number checked. 

     

    Click here to know more about HbA1c (PDF)

    • Every time you visit the doctor, get your blood pressure checked

    • At least once a year, have your cholesterol checked

    • Get a dilated and complete eye exam by an eye care specialist (an ophthalmologist or an optometrist) once a year 
    • Make sure your exam results are sent to your diabetes care team. They should be part of your medical record 
    • Call your eye care specialist or diabetes care team right away if you notice any change in your vision

    • Once a year, have your urine and blood tested 
    • Keep your blood sugar readings and blood pressure as close to your goal as possible

    • Once a year, get a complete foot exam by your doctor 
    • Get a complete exam during every visit if you have problems with your feet, like loss of feeling, changes in the shape of your feet, or sores (foot ulcers) 
    • Take your socks and shoes off during every office visit 
    • At home: 

            -  Check your feet every day for any sign of injury 

            -  Inspect your feet every day for cuts, blisters, cracks, swelling, and dry skin 

            -  Tell your doctor about any injury that does not heal   

            -  Wear shoes and socks that fit well. Do not go barefoot 

     

    Click here to know more about foot care tips (PDF)

    • Visit your dentist regularly

    • It is really important to stop smoking if you have diabetes 
    • Here are some steps to help: 
    • Decide on a quit date. (Choose a time when you won't be too stressed) 
    • Reward yourself for every successful non-smoking day

    Discuss with your doctor about diabetes care plan, and make sure you know what steps you need to take. Below is the check-list you can utilise when you complete each step of your plan: 

    • A plan for how and when to check your blood sugar 
    • A plan for when to take your diabetes medicines 
    • A schedule for regular health check-ups 
    • Ways to deal with stress 
    • A physical activity plan 
    • A meal plan 
    • A plan for meeting other health goals (such as managing blood pressure and cholesterol) 

     

    Click here for your own diabetes monitoring card (PDF)